Move away from pain, move forward optimal posture and wellness.

We help each member of the family to relieve their pain or other symptoms, correct their posture and obtain optimal spinal function, and then to maintain optimal health through, amongst others, regular adjustments and physical activity.

From pain relief to optimal health

To be without pain… is this being cured? Of course not. In our society, little emphasis is placed on prevention. Yet everyone agrees that “prevention is better than cure”. Prevention is not only economical; it is also the best way to not lose valuable time on being sick.

1. Intensive initial care
If you suffer from acute pain, emphasis will first be put on relieving the symptoms. Your chiropractor will nonetheless do a complete health check and will also examine your spine and your posture during your first visit.

Pain that suddenly appears following for example, a false movement, is often the result of several months, even several years of poor function. It is essential that your chiropractor examine you thoroughly to detect all possible causes of your acute symptoms.

In addition to spinal “adjustments”, muscle work and other therapies performed during your first visits, your chiropractor will provide advice in order to quickly regain control over your acute condition.

2. Corrective care
During your third visit, your chiropractor will recommend corrective care. We will explain whatthis implies: the time required, the frequency of visits, the exercises to do and any recommendations that your chiropractor may give you in order for to you obtain optimum health.

Corrective care requires time. Posture disorders, misalignment of the spine and other disorders that your chiropractor will recommend correcting have settled slowly over the years. This is true, even if thepain has appeared recently due to something insignificant.

3. Preventive and periodic care
Once you have completed your corrective care, your chiropractor will usually recommend periodic preventive care, also known as wellness treatment. They have several objectives and benefits:

– Maintaining optimal function of your spine.
– Preventing relapses of acute injuries such lower back injuries.
– Early detection, before symptoms appear, of posture and spine disorders.
– Monitoring problems or discomfort you feel on a daily basis.
– Maintaining your current file at our clinic, in order to facilitate access to care, in case of an emergency or pressing need.
– Getting answers to your questions concerning your health from an available qualified Healthcare Professional.

 

 

Sports Chiropractic

Over the past 18 years, we have helped more than 4000 people to relieve their pain, correct their posture and find lasting solutions in order to maintain optimal health. Also, many athletes at all levels were able to resume competition and perform at their personal best, thanks to the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries we offer.

With the growing popularity of running, many of our patients practice this activity with passion and commitment. Dr. Lepage being a marathoner himself, our patients arevery confident in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries related to running, in the preparation forlong-distance events or simply to learn how to start running without injury.

 

Family Chiropractic

The clientele we serve is composed mainly of families whose members place health as their basic value, participate in regular physical activities and maintain good postural hygiene, as well as a healthy lifestyle.

We help each member of these families to relieve their pain or other symptoms, correct their posture and obtain optimal spinal function, and then to maintain optimal health through, amongst others, regular adjustments and physical activity.

family-kids-happy-people-46252

 

IT-band Syndrome.

October 2019 newsletter.

Text from: Sports Injury Clinic, The Sports Injury Clinic on the net.

Symptoms

Iliotibial band syndrome results in pain on the outside of the knee which is caused by friction of the iliotibial band on the side of the knee. It is also known as ITB syndrome.

Symptoms of ITB syndrome consist of pain on the outside of the knee, more specifically at or around the lateral epicondyle of the femur or bony bit on the outside of the knee. It comes on at a certain time into a run and gradually gets worse until often the runner has to stop. After a period of rest the pain may go only to return when running starts again. The pain is normally aggravated by running, particularly downhill. Pain may be felt when bending and straightening the knee which may be made worse by pressing in at the side of the knee over the sore part. There might be tightness in the iliotibial band which runs down the outside of the thigh.

Causes

Certain factors may make you more susceptible to developing runners knee or iliotibial band syndrome. A naturally tight or wide IT band may make someone more susceptible to this injury. Weak hip muscles, particularly the gluteus medius are also thought to be a significant factor. Over pronation or poor foot biomechanics may increase the risk of injury. If the foot rolls in or flattens, the lower leg rotates and so does the knee increasing the chance of friction on the band. Other factors include leg length difference, running on hills or on cambered roads.

Treatment

Rest – Rest is important to allow the inflamed tendon to heal. Activities other than running which do not make the pain worse such as swimming or cycling should be done to maintain fitness.

Ice – Apply ice to reduce pain and inflammation. Ice should be applied for 10 to 15 minutes every hour until initial pain has gone then later 2 or 3 times a day and / or after exercise is a good idea.

Stretching exercises – Stretching exercises for the muscles on the outside of the hip in particular are important. The tensor fascia latae muscle is the muscle at the top of the IT band and if this is tight then it can cause the band to be tight increasing the friction on the side of the knee. Using a foam roller on the IT band and gluteal muscles can help stretch the iliotibial band and remove any tight knots or lumps in the tendon.

Strengthening exercises – Improving the strength of the muscles on the outside of the hip which abduct the leg will help prevent the knee turning inwards when running or walking and therefore help reduce the friction on the ITB tendon at the knee. In particular strengthening exercises for the tensor fascia latae muscle and gluteus medius such as heel drops, clam exercise and hip abduction are important.

Ultrasound – Use of electrotherapeutic treatment techniques such as TENS or ultrasound may help reduce pain and inflammation.

Training modification – Errors in training should be identified and corrected. These can include over training or increasing running mileage too quickly. As a general rule a runner should not increase mileage by more than 10% per week. Running across a slope or camber in the road for long periods or poor foot biomechanics should be considered. Also avoid too much downhill running.

Train safely!

The Proper Running Form .

July 2019 newsletter.

Source :Text in part from Runnersworld.com, Ashley Mateo.  Image from Runtastic.com.

The better your form, the easier running feels — especially when you start to get fatigued. While everyone’s natural mechanics are different, here’s what you should be paying attention to when you run, from your head to your toes.

Your Head.  “Be sure to gaze directly in front of you,” says Kelli Fierras, USATF-certified running coach and ASICS Studio trainer. “Don’t tilt your chin up or down, which happens when people get tired,” she adds. “You want to have your ears in line with your shoulders.

Your Shoulders.  We spend so much time hunched over at our desks and on our phones, but it’s crucial to open up your shoulders while you run, says Amanda Nurse, an elite marathoner, running coach, and certified yoga instructor in Boston. “You should pull them back, almost like you’re squeezing a pencil between your shoulder blades,” she says.

Cadrée Runtastic

Your Arms.  “Your elbows should be at a 90-degree angle,” says Nurse. Your palms or fists move from chin to hip. Keep your elbows close to your sides. “If your elbows point outwards, that means your arms are crossing your body, which actually slows you down. Try pointing your thumbs to the ceiling to keep your arms in line or imagining an invisible line that runs down the center of your body—don’t let your hands cross over that line.

Your Hands.  Don’t forget to keep your hands relaxed. “I always think about pretending you have a potato chip between your index finger or your middle finger and your thumb so that your hands are really relaxed,” says Nurse “The more you squeeze your hands, the more energy that you’re getting rid of through your hands.

Your Torso.  In most forms of fitness, your core—which includes your back—is really where all your power comes from, and it’s also your center of gravity while running. “You always want to keep a tight core while running—it’ll prevent you from going too far forward or too far backwards,” says Fierras.

Your Hips.  When you’re running, you want lean slightly into the run versus running completely upright. “That lean should come from the hinge at your hips, not from rolling your shoulders forward,” says Fierras. That means your torso will be slightly forward of your hips.

Your Knees.  Your knee should be in line with the middle of your foot so that when your foot strikes the ground, it’s right under your knee. “You really want to focus of keeping that knee directly in front of your hips versus turning in or bowing out, which is very hard for people to train themselves to do,” she says.

Your Legs.  The easiest way to think about your lower body is to think about your shin being as close to perpendicular as possible when the foot hits the ground,” Mahon says. “If you land at that 90-degree angle, then you get to use your ankle, your knee joint, and the hip joint all at the same time to both absorb shock and then create energy.”

Your Feet.  There’s no right or wrong way for your feet to hit the ground, as long as you’re actually using them to push off (instead of just lifting them). That said, the idea is to aim to hit the road with the ball of your foot, Fierras says. Running on your toes or striking with your heel are both more likely to set you up for injury. If that’s how you run naturally, though, “rather than focusing on changing your stride, talk to an expert about getting into a proper shoe—maybe one with more cushioning—that will help you stay injury-free,” Nurse says.

Pack It Light. Wear it Right.

August 2019 newsletter.

Source : Canadian Chiropractic Association

It’s common for kids to lug around backpacks apprearing to be twice their body weight. Though it may seem cool to sling a heavy load over one shoulder – long-term head, neck and shoulder pain is not. Here are some helpful tips that will help your child carry their backpack with ease.

Backpacks can affect your child’s health

Carrying a heavy load can lead to poor posture and a distorted spinal column. Over time this can cause muscle strain, headaches, back, neck and arm pain, and even nerve damage.

A heavy backpack carried on one shoulder forces the muscles and spine tocompensate for the uneven weight. This places stress on the mid and lower back.

Choose the right backpack

  • Select a lightweight backpack in vinyl or canvas.
  • Pick a backpack with two wide, adjustable and padded shoulder straps, along with a hip or waist strap, and padded back.
  • Try the backpack for fit and comfort – ensure it’s not too snug around the shoulders and armpits, and that it’s proportionate to the wearer’s body type.

Packing it properly

  • Your child’s backpack should only contain what is needed for that day.
  • A full backpack should be no more than 10 to 15 per cent of the wearer’s body weight.
  • Place the heaviest objects close to the body and light or odd-shaped objects away from the back.

Putting the backpack on

  • Place the backpack on a flat surface and slip on the backpack one shoulder at a time, adjust the straps to fit comfortably.
  • When lifting the backpack use both arms and legs, and bend at the knees – give young children a hand.

 

Wearing a backpack

  • Backpacks should never be worn over only one shoulder – this can result in neck, shoulder and back pain.
    •Both shoulder straps should be used and adjusted so the backpack sits flush against the back.
    •Test the fit of the backpack by sliding your hand between the backpack and your child’s back – if you can’t slide your hand in, the backpack is too snug.