Move away from pain, move forward optimal posture and wellness.

We help each member of the family to relieve their pain or other symptoms, correct their posture and obtain optimal spinal function, and then to maintain optimal health through, amongst others, regular adjustments and physical activity.

From pain relief to optimal health

To be without pain… is this being cured? Of course not. In our society, little emphasis is placed on prevention. Yet everyone agrees that “prevention is better than cure”. Prevention is not only economical; it is also the best way to not lose valuable time on being sick.

1. Intensive initial care
If you suffer from acute pain, emphasis will first be put on relieving the symptoms. Your chiropractor will nonetheless do a complete health check and will also examine your spine and your posture during your first visit.

Pain that suddenly appears following for example, a false movement, is often the result of several months, even several years of poor function. It is essential that your chiropractor examine you thoroughly to detect all possible causes of your acute symptoms.

In addition to spinal “adjustments”, muscle work and other therapies performed during your first visits, your chiropractor will provide advice in order to quickly regain control over your acute condition.

2. Corrective care
During your third visit, your chiropractor will recommend corrective care. We will explain whatthis implies: the time required, the frequency of visits, the exercises to do and any recommendations that your chiropractor may give you in order for to you obtain optimum health.

Corrective care requires time. Posture disorders, misalignment of the spine and other disorders that your chiropractor will recommend correcting have settled slowly over the years. This is true, even if thepain has appeared recently due to something insignificant.

3. Preventive and periodic care
Once you have completed your corrective care, your chiropractor will usually recommend periodic preventive care, also known as wellness treatment. They have several objectives and benefits:

– Maintaining optimal function of your spine.
– Preventing relapses of acute injuries such lower back injuries.
– Early detection, before symptoms appear, of posture and spine disorders.
– Monitoring problems or discomfort you feel on a daily basis.
– Maintaining your current file at our clinic, in order to facilitate access to care, in case of an emergency or pressing need.
– Getting answers to your questions concerning your health from an available qualified Healthcare Professional.

 

 

Sports Chiropractic

Over the past 18 years, we have helped more than 4000 people to relieve their pain, correct their posture and find lasting solutions in order to maintain optimal health. Also, many athletes at all levels were able to resume competition and perform at their personal best, thanks to the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries we offer.

With the growing popularity of running, many of our patients practice this activity with passion and commitment. Dr. Lepage being a marathoner himself, our patients arevery confident in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries related to running, in the preparation forlong-distance events or simply to learn how to start running without injury.

 

Family Chiropractic

The clientele we serve is composed mainly of families whose members place health as their basic value, participate in regular physical activities and maintain good postural hygiene, as well as a healthy lifestyle.

We help each member of these families to relieve their pain or other symptoms, correct their posture and obtain optimal spinal function, and then to maintain optimal health through, amongst others, regular adjustments and physical activity.

family-kids-happy-people-46252

 

Plantar Fasciitis

December 2019 newsletter.

Sources: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons & Runner’s World Magazine. Images: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

The plantar fascia is a long, thin ligament that lies directly beneath the skin on the bottom of your foot. It connects the heel to the front of your foot, and supports the arch of your foot. Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of pain on the bottom of the heel. It occurs when this strong band of tissue becomes irritated and inflamed.

Causes. Plantar fasciitis can be caused by biomechanical flaws, including flat, high-arched feet and tight calves muscles; excessive pronation and being overweight. In some cases, plantar fasciitis can develop without a specific, identifiable reason. Especially for runners, sudden increases in training mileage; beginning speed or hill work; wearing worn or inappropriate running shoes; running on hard surfaces, like asphalt or concrete; or wearing high heels all day before switching into flat running shoes can overload the plantar fascia and lead to plantar fasciitis.

Symptoms.  Plantar fasciitis sufferers feel a sharp stab or deep ache in the middle of the heel or along the arch. Another sign is the morning hobble from the foot trying to heal itself in a contracted position overnight. Taking that first step causes sudden strain on the bottom of the foot. The pain can recur after long spells of sitting, but it tends to fade during a run, once the area is warmed up.

Prevention and treatment of plantar fasciitis.  Plantar fasciitis can be a nagging problem, which gets worse and more difficult to treat the longer it’s present. To prevent plantar fasciitis, run on soft surfaces, keep mileage increases to less than 10 percent per week, and visit a specialty running shop to make sure you’re wearing the proper shoes for your foot type and gait. It’s also important to stretch the plantar fascia and calves muscles.

At the first sign of soreness, massage (roll a golf ball under your foot) and apply ice (roll a frozen bottle of water under your foot, 3 to 4 times a day). What you wear on your feet when you’re not running makes a difference. Arch support is key, and walking around barefoot or in flimsy shoes can delay recovery.

Rest.  Decreasing or even stopping the activities that make the pain worse is the first step in reducing the pain. Crosstraining (doing other sports, where your feet don’t pound on hard surfaces) is a good way to stay fit during your recovery.

Stretchings.  Plantar fasciitis is aggravated by tight muscles in your feet and calves. Ask your health care provider how to stretch these structures.

Ultrasound therapy.  Ultrasounds are helpful in reducing inflammation, increasing plantar fascia extensibility and in speeding the healing process.

Supportive shoes and orthotics.  Shoes with thick soles and extra cushioning can reduce pain with standing and walking. As you step and your heel strikes the ground, a significant amount of tension is placed on the fascia, which causes microtrauma (tiny tears in the tissue). A cushioned shoe or custom orthotics reduces this tension and the microtrauma that occurs with every step. Night splints. Most people sleep with their feet pointed down. This relaxes the plantar fascia and is one of the reasons for morning heel pain. A night splint stretches the plantar fascia while you sleep and is sometimes necessary to treat this condition.

Cortisone injections and surgery.  Cortisone is a powerful anti-inflammatory medication that can be injected into the plantar fascia to reduce inflammation and pain. However, it should be seen as a last resort solution, because multiple steroid injections can cause the plantar fascia to rupture (tear). Surgery gives usually good results. However, because it can result in chronic pain and complications, it is recommended only after all nonsurgical measures have been exhausted.

Lisfranc Injuries.

November 2019 newsletter.

Text from: Running doc’s guide to healthy running (Lewis G. Maharam).

Lisfranc foot injuries occur in the midfoot.  They’re named after French surgeon Jacques Lisfranc, who in the 1800s, as a member of Napoleon’s army, first described an injury sustained by mounted soldiers whose foot got caught in the saddle’s stirrup as they got thrown off the horse.  Nowadays, the injury happens when stepping into a pothole in the road, twisting the foot, or pushing off with force as a football lineman might do.  These injuries can be ligament sprains, dislocations of the joints between the forefoot and midfoot, or fractures of the bones in the midfoot complex. 

Anatomically, the Lisfranc joints are between the tarsometatarsal joints involving the cuneiform bone and metatarsal bones, as shown in the figure.  Only a small percentage of Lisfranc injuries are fractures or dislocations; most are sprains involving the ligaments. 

Diagnosis

After palpating the foot, twisting the midfoot and checking the pulse on the top of the foot (because the artery there can sometimes be injured, too), the health care provider will generally order standing and non-weight-bearing X-rays. 

Treatment

Treatment varies depending on whether the injury is a sprain or a fracture.  A sprain will usually be treated in a non-weight-bearing cast boot (meaning that you cannot walk on the cast and will have to use crutches) for about 6 weeks.  After removal, physical therapy and a very gradual return to sports usually take 8 to 12 weeks.  Fractures and dislocations will often require surgery.

Non surgical treatment

Rest – Rest is important to allow the inflamed ligaments to heal. Activities other than running which do not make the pain worse such as swimming or cycling should be done to maintain fitness.

Ice – Apply ice to reduce pain and inflammation. Ice should be applied for 10 to 15 minutes every hour until initial pain has gone then later 2 or 3 times a day and / or after exercise is a good idea.

Stretching and strengthening exercises – Your healthcare provider will prescribe you Stretching and strengthening exercises to enhance the healing process and prevent relapse.

Ultrasound – Use of electrotherapeutic treatment techniques such as TENS or ultrasound may help reduce pain and inflammation.

Train safely!

IT-band Syndrome.

October 2019 newsletter.

Text from: Sports Injury Clinic, The Sports Injury Clinic on the net.

Symptoms

Iliotibial band syndrome results in pain on the outside of the knee which is caused by friction of the iliotibial band on the side of the knee. It is also known as ITB syndrome.

Symptoms of ITB syndrome consist of pain on the outside of the knee, more specifically at or around the lateral epicondyle of the femur or bony bit on the outside of the knee. It comes on at a certain time into a run and gradually gets worse until often the runner has to stop. After a period of rest the pain may go only to return when running starts again. The pain is normally aggravated by running, particularly downhill. Pain may be felt when bending and straightening the knee which may be made worse by pressing in at the side of the knee over the sore part. There might be tightness in the iliotibial band which runs down the outside of the thigh.

Causes

Certain factors may make you more susceptible to developing runners knee or iliotibial band syndrome. A naturally tight or wide IT band may make someone more susceptible to this injury. Weak hip muscles, particularly the gluteus medius are also thought to be a significant factor. Over pronation or poor foot biomechanics may increase the risk of injury. If the foot rolls in or flattens, the lower leg rotates and so does the knee increasing the chance of friction on the band. Other factors include leg length difference, running on hills or on cambered roads.

Treatment

Rest – Rest is important to allow the inflamed tendon to heal. Activities other than running which do not make the pain worse such as swimming or cycling should be done to maintain fitness.

Ice – Apply ice to reduce pain and inflammation. Ice should be applied for 10 to 15 minutes every hour until initial pain has gone then later 2 or 3 times a day and / or after exercise is a good idea.

Stretching exercises – Stretching exercises for the muscles on the outside of the hip in particular are important. The tensor fascia latae muscle is the muscle at the top of the IT band and if this is tight then it can cause the band to be tight increasing the friction on the side of the knee. Using a foam roller on the IT band and gluteal muscles can help stretch the iliotibial band and remove any tight knots or lumps in the tendon.

Strengthening exercises – Improving the strength of the muscles on the outside of the hip which abduct the leg will help prevent the knee turning inwards when running or walking and therefore help reduce the friction on the ITB tendon at the knee. In particular strengthening exercises for the tensor fascia latae muscle and gluteus medius such as heel drops, clam exercise and hip abduction are important.

Ultrasound – Use of electrotherapeutic treatment techniques such as TENS or ultrasound may help reduce pain and inflammation.

Training modification – Errors in training should be identified and corrected. These can include over training or increasing running mileage too quickly. As a general rule a runner should not increase mileage by more than 10% per week. Running across a slope or camber in the road for long periods or poor foot biomechanics should be considered. Also avoid too much downhill running.

Train safely!